Restoration Projects in the Yuba Watershed

Aspen Regeneration at Rucker Lake

Aspen stands in the Sierra Nevada are in decline. After a century of fire suppression and grazing pressure, high elevation aspen populations are seriously threatened by conifer encroachment. Restoring aspen stands is a critical strategy of the US Forest Service (USFS) Pacific Southwest Region. Without treatment, these iconic high elevation aspen systems will continue to be replaced by conifer forests resulting in a loss of critical habitat for a diversity of wildlife, plants, and rare species.

Aspen Regeneration at Bear Meadow

Aspen stands in the Sierra Nevada are in decline. After a century of fire suppression and grazing pressure, high elevation aspen populations are seriously threatened by conifer encroachment. Restoring aspen stands is a critical strategy of the US Forest Service (USFS) Pacific Southwest Region. Without treatment, these iconic high elevation aspen systems will continue to be replaced by conifer forests resulting in a loss of critical habitat for a diversity of wildlife, plants, and rare species.

Aspen Regeneration at Butcher Ranch

Aspen stands in the Sierra Nevada are in decline. After a century of fire suppression and grazing pressure, high elevation aspen populations are seriously threatened by conifer encroachment. Restoring aspen stands is a critical strategy of the US Forest Service (USFS) Pacific Southwest Region. Without treatment, these iconic high elevation aspen systems will continue to be replaced by conifer forests resulting in a loss of critical habitat for a diversity of wildlife, plants, and rare species.

Aspen Regeneration at Loney Meadow

Aspen stands in the Sierra Nevada are in decline. After a century of fire suppression and grazing pressure, high elevation aspen populations are seriously threatened by conifer encroachment. Restoring aspen stands is a critical strategy of the US Forest Service (USFS) Pacific Southwest Region. Without treatment, these iconic high elevation aspen systems will continue to be replaced by conifer forests resulting in a loss of critical habitat for a diversity of wildlife, plants, and rare species.

Aspen Regeneration in Pierce Wetland

With funding from the USFS Resource Advisory Committee, in partnership with Tahoe National Forest, SYRCL with a volunteer crew treated half an acre of aspen habitat at Pierce Wetland by removing about one hundred of conifers in 2012. Aspen stands in the Sierra Nevada are in decline. After a century of fire suppression and grazing pressure, high elevation aspen populations are seriously threatened by conifer encroachment. Restoring aspen stands is a critical strategy of the US Forest Service (USFS) Pacific Southwest Region.

Hammon Bar Riparian Enhancement Project

The Hammon Bar Riparian Enhancement Project is designed to test the methods and resulting habitat benefits of planting large cuttings of cottonwood and willow trees. Expected outcomes include increased riparian canopy on the floodplain, increased deposition of fine sediment and organic material, hydraulic cover and rearing habitat for juvenile salmonids, and increased local production of large woody material .

Invasive Weed Removal at Edward's Crossing

Since 2006, SYRCL has conducted invasive weed removal at Edward's Crossing. Currently, SYRCL has partnered with the Bureau of Land Management to remove English ivy at a 2 acres along the South Yuba River. English ivy is a noxious weed that chokes out native vegetation. Dense thickets block access of larger wildlife to water and other resources, as well as cause problems for people trying to enjoy parks and natural areas.

Invasive Weed Removal at Kentucky Ravine

Since 2007, SYRCL has conducted invasive weed removal at Kentucky Ravine. Currently, SYRCL has partnered with the South Yuba River State Park to remove Himalyan blackberry and Vinca vine at a 2.5 acres of migrating song bird habitat along the creek. Himalayan blackberry and vinca vine are two noxious weeds that choke out native vegetation. Dense thickets block access of larger wildlife to water and other resources, as well as cause problems for people trying to enjoy parks and natural areas. Volunteers are trained in safety before work begins.

Meadow Assessment at Deer Meadow

The USFS will conduct a hydrologic assessment of the whole meadow with the result being a list of remmended design actions to enhance the meadow.

Meadow Restoration at Black Jack Ravine

Currently a road cuts through a part of Blackjack meadow. The road is draining the meadow and drying thesoil. As part of this project the road will be removed and the drainage will be stopped.

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